Reactome: A Curated Pathway Database
Results 1 to 10 of 77
Pathways (23) Reactions (25) Proteins (3) Others (26)
Protein: UniProt:P08754 GNAI3 (Homo sapiens)
Last changed: 2015-03-12 14:00:50

Pathway: Signal Transduction (Homo sapiens)
Signal transduction is a process in which extracellular signals elicit changes in cell state and activity. Transmembrane receptors sense changes in the cellular environment by binding ligands, such as hormones and growth factors, or reacting to other types of stimuli, such as light. Stimulation of transmembrane receptors leads to their conformational change which propagates the signal to the intracellu
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

Pathway: Neuronal System (Homo sapiens)
The human brain contains at least 100 billion neurons, each with the ability to influence many other cells. Clearly, highly sophisticated and efficient mechanisms are needed to enable communication among this astronomical number of elements. This communication occurs across synapses, the functional connection between neurons. Synapses can be divided into two general classes: electrical synapses and che
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

Pathway: Hemostasis (Homo sapiens)
Hemostasis is a physiological response that culminates in the arrest of bleeding from an injured vessel. Under normal conditions the vascular endothelium supports vasodilation, inhibits platelet adhesion and activation, suppresses coagulation, enhances fibrin cleavage and is anti-inflammatory in character. Under acute vascular trauma, vasoconstrictor mechanisms predominate and the endothelium becomes p
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

Pathway: Signal amplification (Homo sapiens)
In the initial response to injury, platelets adhere to damaged blood vessels, responding to the exposure of collagen from the vascular epithelium. Once adhered they degranulate, releasing stored secondary agents such as ADP and ATP, and synthesized thromboxane A2. These amplify the response, activating and recruiting further platelets to the area and promoting platelet aggregation. Adenosine nucleotide
Last changed: 2015-03-06 18:40:03

Pathway: GPCR ligand binding (Homo sapiens)
There are more than 800 G-protein coupled receptor (GPCRs) in the human genome, making it the largest receptor superfamily. GPCRs are also the largest class of drug targets, involved in virtually all physiological processes (Frederiksson 2003). GPCRs are receptors for a diverse range of ligands from large proteins to photons (Kristiansen et al. 2004) and have an equal diversity of ligand-binding mechan
Last changed: 2015-03-06 18:40:03

Pathway: Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding And Downstream Transmission In The Postsynaptic Cell (Homo sapiens)
The neurotransmitter in the synaptic cleft released by the pre-synaptic neuron binds specific receptors located on the post-synaptic terminal. These receptors are either ion channels or G protein coupled receptors that function to transmit the signals from the post-synaptic membrane to the cell body
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

Pathway: Transmission across Chemical Synapses (Homo sapiens)
Chemical synapses are specialized junctions that are used for communication between neurons, neurons and muscle or gland cells. The synapse involves a pre-synaptic neuron and a post-synaptic neuron, muscle cell or glad cell. The pre and the post-synaptic cell are separated by a gap of 20nm called the synaptic cleft. The signals pass in a unidirection from pre-synaptic to post-synaptic. The pre-synapti
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

Pathway: Platelet activation, signaling and aggregation (Homo sapiens)
Platelet activation begins with the initial binding of adhesive ligands and of the excitatory platelet agonists (released or generated at the sites of vascular trauma) to cognate receptors on the platelet membrane (Ruggeri 2002). Intracellular signaling reactions then enhance the adhesive and procoagulant properties of tethered platelets or of platelets circulating in the proximity. Once platelets have
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

Pathway: GPCR downstream signaling (Homo sapiens)
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classically defined as the receptor, G-protein and downstream effectors, the alpha subunit of the G-protein being the primary signaling molecule. However, it has become clear that this greatly oversimplifies the complexities of GPCR signaling (see Gurevich & Gurevich, 2008). The beta:gamma G-protein dimer is also involved in downstream signaling (Smrcka, 2008), a
Last changed: 2015-03-06 23:15:47

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