Reactome: A Curated Pathway Database
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Pathways (16) Reactions (4) Proteins (1) Others (3)
Pathway: Disease (Homo sapiens)
Biological processes are captured in Reactome by identifying the molecules (DNA, RNA, protein, small molecules) involved in them and describing the details of their interactions. From this molecular viewpoint, human disease pathways have three mechanistic causes: the inclusion of microbially-expressed proteins, altered functions of human proteins, or changed expression levels of otherwise functionally
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: Signal Transduction (Homo sapiens)
Signal transduction is a process in which extracellular signals elicit changes in cell state and activity. Transmembrane receptors sense changes in the cellular environment by binding ligands, such as hormones and growth factors, or reacting to other types of stimuli, such as light. Stimulation of transmembrane receptors leads to their conformational change which propagates the signal to the intracellu
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: Immune System (Homo sapiens)
Humans are exposed to millions of potential pathogens daily, through contact, ingestion, and inhalation. Our ability to avoid infection depends on the adaptive immune system and during the first critical hours and days of exposure to a new pathogen, our innate immune system
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: GPCR ligand binding (Homo sapiens)
There are more than 800 G-protein coupled receptor (GPCRs) in the human genome, making it the largest receptor superfamily. GPCRs are also the largest class of drug targets, involved in virtually all physiological processes (Frederiksson 2003). GPCRs are receptors for a diverse range of ligands from large proteins to photons (Kristiansen et al. 2004) and have an equal diversity of ligand-binding mechan
Last changed: 2014-11-21 14:40:22

Pathway: Defective ACTH causes Obesity and Pro-opiomelanocortinin deficiency (POMCD) (Homo sapiens)
The precursor peptide pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gives rise to many peptide hormones through cleavage. The cleavage products corticotropin (ACTH) and beta-lipotropin give rise to smaller peptides that have distinct biologic activities: alpha-melanotropin and corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP) are formed from ACTH; gamma-LPH and beta-endorphin are formed from beta-LPH. ACTH (POMC(138-1
Last changed: 2014-11-21 14:40:22

Pathway: Innate Immune System (Homo sapiens)
Innate immunity encompases the nonspecific part of immunity tha are part of an individual's natural biologic makeup
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: GPCR downstream signaling (Homo sapiens)
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classically defined as the receptor, G-protein and downstream effectors, the alpha subunit of the G-protein being the primary signaling molecule. However, it has become clear that this greatly oversimplifies the complexities of GPCR signaling (see Gurevich & Gurevich, 2008). The beta:gamma G-protein dimer is also involved in downstream signaling (Smrcka, 2008), a
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: Cytosolic sensors of pathogen-associated DNA (Homo sapiens)
Presence of pathogen-associated DNA in cytosol induces type I IFN production. Several intracellular receptors have been implicated to some degree. These include DNA-dependent activator of interferon (IFN)-regulatory factors (DAI) (also called Z-DNA-binding protein 1, ZBP1), absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), RNA polymerase III (Pol III), IFN-inducible protein IFI16, leucine-rich repeat flightless interacting
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: Signaling by GPCR (Homo sapiens)
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; 7TM receptors; seven transmembrane domain receptors; heptahelical receptors; G protein-linked receptors [GPLR]) are the largest family of transmembrane receptors in humans, accounting for more than 1% of the protein-coding capacity of the human genome. All known GPCRs share a common architecture of seven membrane-spanning helices connected by intra- and extracellular
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

Pathway: Metabolic disorders of biological oxidation enzymes (Homo sapiens)
The ability to process xenobiotica and many endogenous compounds is called biotransformation and is catalysed by enzymes mainly in the liver of higher organisms but also a number of other organs such as kidneys, gut and lungs. Metabolism occurs in two stages; phase 1 functionalisation and phase 2 conjugation. Defects in enzymes in these two phases can lead to disease (Nebert et al. 2013, Pikuleva & Wat
Last changed: 2014-11-21 19:49:01

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