Search results for BSG

Showing 16 results out of 20

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Species

Types

Compartments

Reaction types

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Protein (2 results from a total of 2)

BSG

Identifier: R-HSA-197673
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Primary external reference: UniProt: BSG: P35613

BSG

Identifier: R-HSA-204478
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: Golgi membrane
Primary external reference: UniProt: BSG: P35613

Complex (6 results from a total of 9)

Identifier: R-HSA-204594
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Identifier: R-HSA-8856537
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Identifier: R-HSA-8856536
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Identifier: R-HSA-8856534
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Identifier: R-HSA-204467
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Identifier: R-HSA-204480
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane

Reaction (6 results from a total of 7)

Identifier: R-HSA-204434
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Basigin is a widely distributed cell-surface protein with two immunoglobulin domains and has shown to associate with both the integrins alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1.
Identifier: R-HSA-9645220
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane, cytosol, extracellular region
Four members of the SLC16A gene family encode classical monocarboxylate transporters, MCT1-4. They all function as proton-dependent transporters of monocarboxylic acids such as lactate and pyruvate and ketone bodies such as acetacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. These processes are crucial in the regulation of energy metabolism and acid-base homeostasis.

SLC16A1 encodes MCT1, a ubiquitiously expressed protein (Garcia et al. 1994). Defects in SLC16A1 are the cause of symptomatic deficiency in lactate transport (SDLT), resulting in an acidic intracellular environment and muscle degeneration (Merezhinskaya et al. 2000). Activating promotor mutations in SLC16A1 are associated with exercise-induced hyperinsulinism (EIHI), a dominantly inherited hypoglycemic disorder characterized by inappropriate insulin secretion during anaerobic exercise or on pyruvate load (Otonkoski et al. 2000). MCT1 requires the binding of a single transmembrane glycoprotein (basigin, BSG) for activity (Halestrap 2013).
Identifier: R-HSA-373875
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: cytosol, plasma membrane, extracellular region
The membrane-associated MCT:basigin complex mediates the reversible export of cytosolic lactate and H+ (Wilson et al. 2005).
Identifier: R-HSA-373867
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: cytosol, plasma membrane, extracellular region
The membrane-associated MCT:basigin complex mediates the reversible uptake of extracellular lactate and H+ (Wilson et al. 2005).
Identifier: R-HSA-204600
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Basigin (Bsg) is a highly glycosylated transmembrane protein belonging to the Ig superfamily with two Ig domains. Bsg forms homo-oligomers on the plasma membrane in a cis-dependent manner. The N-terminal Ig-like domain is functionally important in oligomer formation.
Identifier: R-HSA-375135
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region, plasma membrane
Basigin (BSG, CD147, EMPRIN) is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of most tumor cells. It stimulates stromal cells to produce elevated levels of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), including interstitial collagenase (MMP1). MMPs have been implicated in several aspects of tumor progression, including invasion through basement membranes and interstitial matrices, angiogenesis, and tumor cell growth. Basigin not only stimulates the production of MMP1 but also forms a complex with MMP1 at the tumor cell surface. This interaction may be important in modifying the tumor cell pericellular matrix to promote invasion.

Set (1 results from a total of 1)

Identifier: R-HSA-434162
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane

Pathway (1 results from a total of 1)

Identifier: R-HSA-433692
Species: Homo sapiens
The SLC16A gene family encode proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which mediate the transport of monocarboxylates such as lactate and pyruvate. Monocarboxylates are a major energy source for all cells in the body so their transport in and out of cells is crucial for cellular function. To date, 14 SLC16A members have been identified through sequence homology. Of these 14 members, only seven isoforms have been functionally characterized and not all of these function as proton-coupled transporters. A number can transport diuretics, thyroid hormones and aromatic amino acids. The seven remaining SLC16A members are classed as orphan MCTs (Morris & Felmlee 2008, Merezhinskaya & Fishbein 2009).

In mammalian cells, MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) require association with an ancillary protein to enable plasma membrane expression of the active transporter. Basigin (BSG, CD147) is the preferred binding partner for MCT1, MCT3 and MCT4, while MCT2 requires Embigin (EMB) (Wilson et al. 2005).
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