Search results for FHIT

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Interactor (1 results from a total of 1)

Identifier: P49789
Species: Homo sapiens
Primary external reference: UniProt: P49789

Pathway (2 results from a total of 2)

Identifier: R-HSA-3769402
Species: Homo sapiens
The mechanisms involved in downregulation of TCF-dependent transcription are not yet very well understood. beta-catenin is known to recruit a number of transcriptional repressors, including Reptin, SMRT and NCoR, to the TCF/LEF complex, allowing the transition from activation to repression (Bauer et al, 2000; Weiske et al, 2007; Song and Gelmann, 2008). CTNNBIP1 (also known as ICAT) and Chibby are inhibitors of TCF-dependent signaling that function by binding directly to beta-catenin and preventing interactions with critical components of the transactivation machinery (Takemaru et al, 2003; Li et al, 2008; Tago et al, 2000; Graham et al, 2002; Daniels and Weiss, 2002). Chibby additionally promotes the nuclear export of beta-catenin in conjunction with 14-3-3/YWHAZ proteins (Takemura et al, 2003; Li et al, 2008). A couple of recent studies have also suggested a role for nuclear APC in the disassembly of the beta-catenin activation complex (Hamada and Bienz, 2004; Sierra et al, 2006). It is worth noting that while some of the players involved in the disassembly of the beta-catenin transactivating complex are beginning to be worked out in vitro, the significance of their role in vivo is not yet fully understood, and some can be knocked out with little effect on endogenous WNT signaling (see for instance Voronina et al, 2009).
Identifier: R-HSA-8878159
Species: Homo sapiens
The transcription factor RUNX3 is a RUNX family member. All RUNX family members, RUNX1, RUNX2 and RUNX3, possess a highly conserved Runt domain, involved in DNA binding. For a more detailed description of the structure of RUNX proteins, please refer to the pathway 'Transcriptional regulation by RUNX1'. Similar to RUNX1 and RUNX2, RUNX3 forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with CBFB (CBF-beta). Studies in mice have shown that RUNX3 plays a role in neurogenesis and development of T lymphocytes. RUNX3 is implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in various human malignancies.
During nervous system formation, the Cbfb:Runx3 complex is involved in development of mouse proprioceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons by regulating expression of Ntrk3 (Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 3) and possibly other genes (Inoue et al. 2002, Kramer et al. 2006, Nakamura et al. 2008, Dykes et al. 2011, Ogihara et al. 2016). It is not yet known whether RUNX3 is involved in human neuronal development and neuronal disorders.
RUNX3 plays a major role in immune response. RUNX3 regulates development of T lymphocytes. In mouse hematopoietic stem cells, expression of Runx3 is regulated by the transcription factor TAL1 (Landry et al. 2008). RUNX3 promotes the CD8+ lineage fate in developing thymocytes. In the CD4+ thymocyte lineage in mice, the transcription factor ThPOK induces transcription of SOCS family members, which repress Runx3 expression (Luckey et al. 2014). RUNX3, along with RUNX1 and ETS1, is implicated in regulation of transcription of the CD6 gene, encoding a lymphocyte surface receptor expressed on developing and mature T cells (Arman et al. 2009). RUNX3 and ThPOK regulate intestinal CD4+ T cell immunity in a TGF-beta and retinoic acid-dependent manner, which is important for cellular defense against intestinal pathogens (Reis et al. 2013). Besides T lymphocytes, RUNX3 is a key transcription factor in the commitment of innate lymphoid cells ILC1 and ILC3 (Ebihara et al. 2015). RUNX3 regulates expression of CD11A and CD49D integrin genes, involved in immune and inflammatory responses (Dominguez-Soto et al. 2005). RUNX3 is involved in mouse TGF-beta-mediated dendritic cell function and its deficiency is linked to airway inflammation (Fainaru et al. 2004).
In addition to its developmental role, RUNX3 is implicated as a tumor suppressor. The loss of RUNX3 expression and function was first causally linked to the genesis and progression of human gastric cancer (Li et al. 2002). Expression of RUNX3 increases in human pancreatic islet of Langerhans cells but not in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in response to differentiation stimulus (serum withdrawal) (Levkovitz et al. 2010). Hypermethylation of the RUNX3 gene is associated with an increased risk for progression of Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (Schulmann et al. 2005). Hypermethylation-mediated silencing of the RUNX3 gene expression is also frequent in granulosa cell tumors (Dhillon et al. 2004) and has also been reported in colon cancer (Weisenberger et al. 2006), breast cancer (Lau et al. 2006, Huang et al. 2012), bladder cancer (Wolff et al. 2008) and gastric cancer (Li et al. 2002). In colorectal cancer, RUNX3 is one of the five markers in a gene panel used to classify CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP+) (Weisenberger et al. 2006).
RUNX3 and CBFB are frequently downregulated in gastric cancer. RUNX3 cooperates with TGF-beta to maintain homeostasis in the stomach and is involved in TGF-beta-induced cell cycle arrest of stomach epithelial cells. Runx3 knockout mice exhibit decreased sensitivity to TGF-beta and develop gastric epithelial hyperplasia (Li et al. 2002, Chi et al. 2005). RUNX3-mediated inhibition of binding of TEADs:YAP1 complexes to target promoters is also implicated in gastric cancer suppression (Qiao et al. 2016).
RUNX3 is a negative regulator of NOTCH signaling and RUNX3-mediated inhibition of NOTCH activity may play a tumor suppressor role in hepatocellular carcinoma (Gao et al. 2010, Nishina et al. 2011).
In addition to RUNX3 silencing through promoter hypermethylation in breast cancer (Lau et al. 2006), Runx3+/- mice are predisposed to breast cancer development. RUNX3 downregulates estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) protein levels in a proteasome-dependent manner (Huang et al. 2012).
Besides its tumor suppressor role, mainly manifested through its negative effect on cell proliferation, RUNX3 can promote cancer cell invasion by stimulating expression of genes involved in metastasis, such as osteopontin (SPP1) (Whittle et al. 2015).
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