Search results for HEPH

Showing 8 results out of 8

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Species

Types

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Protein (1 results from a total of 1)

Identifier: R-HSA-904820
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Primary external reference: UniProt: HEPH: Q9BQS7

Interactor (1 results from a total of 1)

Identifier: Q9BQS7-3
Species: Homo sapiens
Primary external reference: UniProt: Q9BQS7-3

Complex (2 results from a total of 2)

Identifier: R-HSA-904821
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
Identifier: R-HSA-9631974
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane

Reaction (3 results from a total of 3)

Identifier: R-HSA-917933
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: external side of plasma membrane
Hephaestin oxidizes ferrous iron (Fe2+) to ferric iron (Fe3+) after export from duodenal cells to enable its transport via transferrin (Griffiths et al, 2005).
Identifier: R-HSA-442368
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: plasma membrane
The primary site for absorption of dietary iron is the duodenum. Ferrous iron (Fe2+) is taken up from the gut lumen across the apical membranes of enterocytes and released into the portal vein circulation across basolateral membranes.
The human gene SLC40A1 encodes the metal transporter protein MTP1 (aka ferroportin or IREG1). This protein resides on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes and mediates ferrous iron efflux into the portal vein (Schimanski et al. 2005). MTP1 colocalizes with hephaestin (HEPH) which stablizes MTP1 and is necessary for the efflux reaction to occur (Han & Kim 2007, Chen et al. 2009). As well as the dudenum, MTP1 is also highly expressed on macrophages (where it mediates iron efflux from the breakdown of haem) and the placenta (where it may mediate the transport of iron from maternal to foetal circulation). It is also expressed in muscle and spleen.
Identifier: R-HSA-5655760
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region, plasma membrane
The primary site for absorption of dietary iron is the duodenum. Ferrous iron (Fe2+) is taken up from the gut lumen across the apical membranes of enterocytes and released into the portal vein circulation across basolateral membranes. The human gene SLC40A1 encodes the metal transporter protein MTP1 (aka ferroportin or IREG1). This protein resides on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes and mediates ferrous iron efflux into the portal vein. SLC40A1 colocalises with hephaestin (HEPH) which stablises it and is necessary for the efflux reaction to occur.
Defects in SLC40A1 can cause hemochromatosis 4 (HFE4; MIM:606069), a disorder of iron metabolism characterised by iron overload. Excess iron is deposited in a variety of organs leading to their failure, resulting in serious illnesses including cirrhosis, hepatomas, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, arthritis and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Severe effects of the disease don't usually appear until after decades of progressive iron overloading. Mutations causing HFE4 include N144H, A77D, V162del, G80V, D181V and D157G (Njajou et al. 2001, Agarwal et al. 2006, Wallace et al. 2002, Cremonesi et al. 2005, Hetet et al. 2003).

Pathway (1 results from a total of 1)

Identifier: R-HSA-5655799
Species: Homo sapiens
The primary site for absorption of dietary iron is the duodenum. Ferrous iron (Fe2+) is taken up from the gut lumen across the apical membranes of enterocytes and released into the portal vein circulation across basolateral membranes. The human gene SLC40A1 encodes the metal transporter protein MTP1 (aka ferroportin or IREG1). This protein resides on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes and mediates ferrous iron efflux into the portal vein. SLC40A1 colocalises with hephaestin (HEPH) which stablises it and is necessary for the efflux reaction to occur.
Defects in SLC40A1 can cause hemochromatosis 4 (HFE4; MIM:606069), a disorder of iron metabolism characterised by iron overload. Excess iron is deposited in a variety of organs leading to their failure, resulting in serious illnesses including cirrhosis, hepatomas, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, arthritis and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Severe effects of the disease don't usually appear until after decades of progressive iron overloading (De Domenico et al. 2005, 2006, 2011, Kaplan et al. 2011).
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