Search results for REG3A

Showing 14 results out of 14

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Protein (3 results from a total of 3)

Identifier: R-HSA-6801352
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Primary external reference: UniProt: REG3A: Q06141
Identifier: R-HSA-6801803
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Primary external reference: UniProt: Q06141
Identifier: R-HSA-6801783
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Primary external reference: UniProt: Q06141

Complex (4 results from a total of 4)

Identifier: R-HSA-6801799
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Identifier: R-HSA-6801795
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Identifier: R-HSA-6801804
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Identifier: R-HSA-6801809
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region

Reaction (4 results from a total of 4)

Identifier: R-HSA-6801776
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region, cell wall
Structural studies of human REG3A by X-ray diffraction with electron microscopy suggest that REG3A binds to bacterial membrane phospholipids and kills bacteria by forming a hexameric membrane-permeabilizing pore (Mukherjee S et al. 2014).
Identifier: R-HSA-6801762
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Regenerating islet-derived 3A (REG3A) is thought to recognize and kill its bacterial targets in two distinct steps (Mukherjee S et al. 2014). First, REG3A is secreted from epithelial cells as a soluble monomer that recognizes Gram-positive bacteria by binding to peptidoglycan carbohydrate via an EPN motif located in the long loop region (Lehotzky RE et al. 2010). Second, REG3A kills bacteria by oligomerizing in the bacterial membrane to form a hexameric membrane-penetrating pore that is predicted to induce uncontrolled ion efflux with subsequent osmotic lysis (Mukherjee S et al. 2014). The inhibitory N-terminus of REG3A propeptide hinders lipid binding and consequently suppresses pore formation until it is removed by trypsin after secretion into the intestinal lumen (Mukherjee S et al. 2009; 2014).
Identifier: R-HSA-6801766
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Regenerating islet-derived 3 (REG3) proteins belong to the family of C-type lectins (Cash HL et al. 2006a,b; Lehotzky RE et al. 2010). REG3A and REG3G are expressed in the intestine where they moodulate the host interactions with commensal and pathogenic gut bacteria. REG3 proteins bind the peptidoglycan moieties of bacteria inducing damage to the bacterial cell wall. The antibacterial activities of REG3 proteins are restricted to Gram-positive bacteria and are tightly controlled by an inhibitory N-terminal prosegment that is removed by trypsin in vivo (Cash HL et al. 2006; Mukherjee S et al. 2009; Medveczky P et al. 2009).
Identifier: R-HSA-6801808
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region, cell wall
Regenerating islet-derived 3 (REG3) proteins belong to the family of C-type lectins (Cash HL et al. 2006a,b; Lehotzky RE et al. 2010). REG3A and REG3G are induced and expressed in the intestine where they function as antibacterial peptides by targeting the peptidoglycan moieties of bacteria. NMR spectroscopy revealed that human REG3A lectin recognized the peptidoglycan carbohydrate backbone in a calcium-independent manner via a conserved “EPN” motif that is critical for bacterial killing (Lehotzky RE et al. 2010). The antibacterial activities of REG3 proteins are restricted to Gram-positive bacteria and are tightly controlled by an inhibitory N-terminal pro-segment that is removed by trypsin in vivo (Cash HL et al. 2006; Mukherjee S et al. 2009; Medveczky P et al. 2009).

Set (3 results from a total of 3)

Identifier: R-HSA-6801779
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Identifier: R-HSA-6801797
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
Identifier: R-HSA-6801794
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: extracellular region
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