Search results for FMO3

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Reaction (3 results from a total of 3)

Identifier: R-HSA-5602966
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: endoplasmic reticulum membrane, endoplasmic reticulum lumen
Trimethylamine (TMA) is present in the diet (in fish) but primarily formed in vivo from the breakdown of choline. It is N-oxidised by FMO3 in the liver, the major isoform active towards TMA. Defects in FMO3 can cause trimethylaminuria (TMAU; MIM:602079, fish-odour syndrome), a human genetic disorder characterised by an impaired ability to convert the malodourous TMA to its odourless N-oxide (Treacy et al. 1998). Mutations that cause TMAU include M66I, P153L, R492W, N61S and E32K (Zhang et al. 2003, Yeung et al. 2007).
Identifier: R-HSA-139970
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: endoplasmic reticulum lumen, endoplasmic reticulum membrane
Trimethylamine (TMA) is present in the diet (in fish) but primarily formed in vivo from the breakdown of choline. It is N-oxidised by FMO3 in the liver, the major isoform active towards TMA, to form trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Trimethylaminuria (fish-odour syndrome) is a human genetic disorder characterised by an impaired ability to convert the malodourous TMA to the odourless N-oxide form TMAO (Higgins et al. 1972, Humbert et al. 1970, Treacy et al. 1998). L-carnitine is an abundant component of red meat and contains a trimethylamine structure similar to that of choline. Gut microbiota is able to produce TMAO from L-carnitine. If high levels of L-carnitine via high red meat intake or dietary supplements is achieved, Koeth et al. have shown the resultant TMAO produced in the gut can accelerate atherosclerosis in mice and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (Koeth et al. 2013).
Identifier: R-HSA-217255
Species: Homo sapiens
Compartment: smooth endoplasmic reticulum
Tamoxifen (TAM) is an antiestrogen and currently used extensively for breast cancer therapy. FMOs, especially FMO1 can N-oxidze TAM to tamoxifen N-oxide (TNO). TNO can be reduced back to TAM by the P450 system. TNO appears to be just as potent as TAM but with fewer side-effects so this metabolic cycling could play a part in the use of TNO in the treatment of breast cancer.
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